Annestown cove – semi-abstract monotype print inspired by Irish coastline

gel print

Annestown cove is one of a series of experiments in working with a limited palette. It is also one of several prints deriving inspiration from a cove beneath a tiny village called Annestown in Co. Waterford. (Bun Abha in Irish.)  Some years ago I used photographs taken there as the basis for some digital prints and these images reinterpret the digital versions into acrylic paint on paper. I’ve used Bun Abha (sometimes I’ve misspelled it as Bun Rabha) and Annestown in the title of several prints in this Lockdown Series all drwing inspiration from this small stretch of the Waterford coastline. The Irish coastline and landscape influences numerous others.

The print was made by gel printing with acrylic paints on paper and is about 30 cm square. It is unmounted and unframed, although if you wish I can mount it on a cradled wooden panel, with black painted edges ready to hang on your wall.

During lockdown, I have made large series of  similar colourful abstract monotype prints. They represent a new direction for my work, one I intend to continue to explore for a good while yet. I would especially like to revisit the Irish landscape in more prints. Even better would be to actually go back to the area. There are many stretches of the Waterford coastline I still want to explore.

What is a gel print?

Monotype prints in general are made by drawing or painting on a smooth, non-absorbent surface. This surface, sometimes called the matrix, was historically a copper etching plate. In contemporary work other materials are often used, such as acrylic sheet. The image on the matrix is then transferred onto a sheet of paper by pressing the two together. This usually requires a print press. Monotypes can also be created by inking an entire surface and then, using brushes or rags, removing ink to create light areas in a field of opaque colour. This is then pressed together with a sheet of paper to make the print.

The specific process I used for this print was gel printing (or Gelli but this is a trademark). The matrix in this case is a soft synthetic gel. I apply the paint to the gel sheet with rollers or brushes. The area to which the paint is applied can be controlled by masks and stencils. The rolled out paints can also be drawn into or textured in various ways. This process is repeated until I’m happy with the image.

Some of my prints made this way have over 20 separate full or partial layers. The nature of the process allows for both intense bright colours and  subtle variations in colour as well as tangible physical texture.

Bun Abha Dusk- semi-abstract monotype print inspired by Irish coastline

gel print

Bun Abha Moon began life as a purely abstract image, an experiment in a limited palette. As it built up however, I began to see a coastal scene, and it started to resemble some digital prints I made some years ago. These used photographs I took in the small cove below the village Bun Abha, known in English as Annestown, a tiny village in Co Waterford. I’ve used Bun Abha (sometimes I’ve misspelled it as Bun Rabha) and Annestown in the title of several prints in this Lockdown Series and the Irish coastline and landscape influences numerous others

The print was made by gel printing with acrylic paints on paper and is about 30 cm square. It is unmounted and unframed, although if you wish I can mount it on a cradled wooden panel, with black painted edges ready to hang on your wall.

During lockdown, I have made large series of  similar colourful abstract monotype prints. They represent a new direction for my work, one I intend to continue to explore for a good while yet. I would especially like to revisit the Irish coastline in more prints. Even better would be to actually go there!

What is a gel print?

Monotype prints in general are made by drawing or painting on a smooth, non-absorbent surface. This surface, sometimes called the matrix, was historically a copper etching plate. In contemporary work other materials are often used, such as acrylic sheet. The image on the matrix is then transferred onto a sheet of paper by pressing the two together. This usually requires a print press. Monotypes can also be created by inking an entire surface and then, using brushes or rags, removing ink to create light areas in a field of opaque colour. This is then pressed together with a sheet of paper to make the print.

The specific process I used for this print was gel printing (or Gelli but this is a trademark). The matrix in this case is a soft synthetic gel. I apply the paint to the gel sheet with rollers or brushes. The area to which the paint is applied can be controlled by masks and stencils. The rolled out paints can also be drawn into or textured in various ways. This process is repeated until I’m happy with the image.

Some of my prints made this way have over 20 separate full or partial layers. The nature of the process allows for both intense bright colours and  subtle variations in colour as well as tangible physical texture.

Bun Abha Moon – semi-abstract monotype print inspired by Irish coastline

semi-abstract monotype print - Irish landscape

Bun Abha Moon began life as a purely abstract image. However, when I added the silver blue shape across it, I was immediately reminded of waves breaking on the shore at night. Bun Abha is the Irish name of a tiny village in Co Waterford, known in English as Annestown. I visited some years ago and used some of my photos of the small cove below the village as a source for digital prints. Since then, I’ve used Bun Abha (sometimes I’ve misspelled it as Bun Rabha) and Annestown in the title of several prints in this Lockdown Series and the Irish landscape influences numerous others

The print was made by gel printing with acrylic paints on paper and is about 30 cm square. It is unmounted and unframed, although if you wish I can mount it on a cradled wooden panel, with black painted edges ready to hang on your wall.

During lockdown, I have made large series of  similar colourful abstract monotype prints. They represent a new direction for my work, one I intend to continue to explore for a good while yet. I would like in particular to revisit the Irish landscape and coastline.

What is a gel print?

Monotype prints in general are made by drawing or painting on a smooth, non-absorbent surface. This surface, sometimes called the matrix, was historically a copper etching plate. In contemporary work other materials are often used, such as acrylic sheet. The image on the matrix is then transferred onto a sheet of paper by pressing the two together. This usually requires a print press. Monotypes can also be created by inking an entire surface and then, using brushes or rags, removing ink to create light areas in a field of opaque colour. This is then pressed together with a sheet of paper to make the print.

The specific process I used for this print was gel printing (or Gelli but this is a trademark). The matrix in this case is a soft synthetic gel. I apply the paint to the gel sheet with rollers or brushes. The area to which the paint is applied can be controlled by masks and stencils. The rolled out paints can also be drawn into or textured in various ways. This process is repeated until I’m happy with the image.

Some of my prints made this way have over 20 separate full or partial layers. This gives subtle variations in colour and a tangible physical texture. The nature of the process allows for intense bright colours and this colourful geometric abstract print is no exception.

A pillar in the desert – abstract landscape

A pillar in the desert abstract landscape

A Pillar in the Desert is an abstract print that nevertheless has clear references to landscape. Like most of this series, it began life as an entirely abstract background layer.  As I added each subsequent layer the image gradually formed into the print you see here. The title reflects my semi-obsession with the art of the neolithic, but also refers to the biblical story of Lot’s wife.

The print was made by gel printing with acrylic paints on paper and is about 30 cm square. It is unmounted and unframed, although if you wish I can mount it on a cradled wooden panel, with black painted edges ready to hang on your wall.

During lockdown, I have made large series of  similar colourful abstract monotype prints. They represent a new direction for my work, one I intend to continue to explore for a good while yet. I am very drawn to the way in which abstract, almost accidental layers of colour can be transformed into a coherent structured artwork, as with this very stylised landscape and other examples such as those inspired by the Irish coastline

What is a gel print?

Monotype prints in general are made by drawing or painting on a smooth, non-absorbent surface. This surface, sometimes called the matrix, was historically a copper etching plate. In contemporary work other materials are often used, such as acrylic sheet. The image on the matrix is then transferred onto a sheet of paper by pressing the two together. This usually requires a print press. Monotypes can also be created by inking an entire surface and then, using brushes or rags, removing ink to create light areas in a field of opaque colour. This is then pressed together with a sheet of paper to make the print.

The specific process I used for this print was gel printing (or Gelli but this is a trademark). The matrix in this case is a soft synthetic gel. I apply the paint to the gel sheet with rollers or brushes. The area to which the paint is applied can be controlled by masks and stencils. The rolled out paints can also be drawn into or textured in various ways. This process is repeated until I’m happy with the image.

Some of my prints made this way have over 20 separate full or partial layers. The nature of the process allows for both intense bright colours and  subtle variations in colour as well as tangible physical texture.+

Orchard – semi-abstract landscape print

semi-abstract landscape

Orchard is a stylised semi-abstract landscape print. It began life as an entirely abstract background layer.  As I added each subsequent layer the image gradually formed into the print you see here.

The print was made by gel printing with acrylic paints on paper and is about 30 cm square. It is unmounted and unframed, although if you wish I can mount it on a cradled wooden panel, with black painted edges ready to hang on your wall.

During lockdown, I have made large series of  similar colourful abstract monotype prints. They represent a new direction for my work, one I intend to continue to explore for a good while yet. I am very drawn to the way in which abstract, almost accidental layers of colour can be transformed into a coherent structured artwork, as with this semi-abstract landscape and other examples such as these inspired by the Irish coastline

What is a gel print?

Monotype prints in general are made by drawing or painting on a smooth, non-absorbent surface. This surface, sometimes called the matrix, was historically a copper etching plate. In contemporary work other materials are often used, such as acrylic sheet. The image on the matrix is then transferred onto a sheet of paper by pressing the two together. This usually requires a print press. Monotypes can also be created by inking an entire surface and then, using brushes or rags, removing ink to create light areas in a field of opaque colour. This is then pressed together with a sheet of paper to make the print.

The specific process I used for this print was gel printing (or Gelli but this is a trademark). The matrix in this case is a soft synthetic gel. I apply the paint to the gel sheet with rollers or brushes. The area to which the paint is applied can be controlled by masks and stencils. The rolled out paints can also be drawn into or textured in various ways. This process is repeated until I’m happy with the image.

Some of my prints made this way have over 20 separate full or partial layers. The nature of the process allows for both intense bright colours and  subtle variations in colour as well as tangible physical texture.+

Far Horizons – monotype print

SOLD

Far Horizons is a monotype gel print. It has a loose grid structure but was still made in my usual fashion of building up layers. It has some structural similarities to Galileo’s Legacy, also found in the shop.

The print is about 30 cm square. It is unmounted and unframed, although if you wish I can mount it on a cradled wooden panel, with black painted edges ready to hang on your wall.

During lockdown, I made a large series of  similar colourful abstract monotype prints. This intuitive approach to creating the image, of seeing the art as a record of a journey as much as being a thing in itself, is new for me, It represents a new direction for my work that I intend to continue to explore for a good while yet. Many draw their inspiration from real places. Others while still abstract, have a link back to the world of experience. Still others are purely abstract without external references beyond broad ideas of harmony and balance. In this case the title Far Horizons simply refers to the horizontal division on the right hand side.

What is a gel print?

Monotype prints in general are made by drawing or painting on a smooth, non-absorbent surface. This surface, sometimes called the matrix, was historically a copper etching plate. In contemporary work other materials are often used, such as acrylic sheet. The image on the matrix is then transferred onto a sheet of paper by pressing the two together. This usually requires a print press. Monotypes can also be created by inking an entire surface and then, using brushes or rags, removing ink to create light areas in a field of opaque colour. This is then pressed together with a sheet of paper to make the print.

The specific process I used for this print was gel printing (or Gelli but this is a trademark). The matrix in this case is a soft synthetic gel. I apply the paint to the gel sheet with rollers or brushes. The area to which the paint is applied can be controlled by masks and stencils. The rolled out paints can also be drawn into or textured in various ways. This process is repeated until I’m happy with the image.

Some of my prints made this way have over 20 separate full or partial layers. The nature of the process allows for both intense bright colours and  subtle variations in colour as well as tangible physical texture.

Lost in Space – monotype print

Lost in space - abstract monotype

Lost in Space is a monotype gel print. I made it in my usual fashion of building up layers. As I add each layer I am directly responding to what I see in front of me. I am very drawn to the way in which abstract, almost accidental layers of colour can be incrementally transformed into a harmonious image. I rarely have an end product in mind, but I tend to have a repertoire of marks from which I draw.  Many shapes are created from torn paper, giving them a diffused edge, combined in this print with strong parallel lines.

The print is about 30 cm square. It is unmounted and unframed, although if you wish I can mount it on a cradled wooden panel, with black painted edges ready to hang on your wall.

During lockdown, I made a large series of  similar colourful abstract monotype prints. This intuitive approach to creating the image, of seeing the art as a record of a journey as much as being a thing in itself, is new for me, It represents a new direction for my work that I intend to continue to explore for a good while yet. Many draw their inspiration from real places. Others while still abstract, have a link back to the world of experience. Still others are purely abstract without external references beyond broad ideas of harmony and balance. In this case the ideas suggested by the title Lost in Space may be read as referencing the literal space between the stars or the metaphorical space of the image.

What is a gel print?

Monotype prints in general are made by drawing or painting on a smooth, non-absorbent surface. This surface, sometimes called the matrix, was historically a copper etching plate. In contemporary work other materials are often used, such as acrylic sheet. The image on the matrix is then transferred onto a sheet of paper by pressing the two together. This usually requires a print press. Monotypes can also be created by inking an entire surface and then, using brushes or rags, removing ink to create light areas in a field of opaque colour. This is then pressed together with a sheet of paper to make the print.

The specific process I used for this print was gel printing (or Gelli but this is a trademark). The matrix in this case is a soft synthetic gel. I apply the paint to the gel sheet with rollers or brushes. The area to which the paint is applied can be controlled by masks and stencils. The rolled out paints can also be drawn into or textured in various ways. This process is repeated until I’m happy with the image.

Some of my prints made this way have over 20 separate full or partial layers. The nature of the process allows for both intense bright colours and  subtle variations in colour as well as tangible physical texture.

Rose of Time – monotype print

Rose of Time

Rose of Time is a monotype gel print. I made it in my usual fashion of building up layers. As I add each layer I am directly responding to what I see in front of me. I rarely have an end product in mind. I am very drawn to the way in which abstract, almost accidental layers of colour can be incrementally transformed into a harmonious image.

The print is about 30 cm square. It is unmounted and unframed, although if you wish I can mount it on a cradled wooden panel, with black painted edges ready to hang on your wall.

During lockdown, I made a large series of  similar colourful abstract monotype prints. This intuitive approach to creating the image, of seeing the art as a record of a journey as much as being a thing in itself, is new for me, It represents a new direction for my work that I intend to continue to explore for a good while yet. Many draw their inspiration from real places, others while still abstract, have a link back to the world of experience, and yet others are pure abstract without external references beyond broad ideas of harmony and balance or as in this case the ideas suggested by the title Rose of Time.

What is a gel print?

Monotype prints in general are made by drawing or painting on a smooth, non-absorbent surface. This surface, sometimes called the matrix, was historically a copper etching plate. In contemporary work other materials are often used, such as acrylic sheet. The image on the matrix is then transferred onto a sheet of paper by pressing the two together. This usually requires a print press. Monotypes can also be created by inking an entire surface and then, using brushes or rags, removing ink to create light areas in a field of opaque colour. This is then pressed together with a sheet of paper to make the print.

The specific process I used for this print was gel printing (or Gelli but this is a trademark). The matrix in this case is a soft synthetic gel. I apply the paint to the gel sheet with rollers or brushes. The area to which the paint is applied can be controlled by masks and stencils. The rolled out paints can also be drawn into or textured in various ways. This process is repeated until I’m happy with the image.

Some of my prints made this way have over 20 separate full or partial layers. The nature of the process allows for both intense bright colours and  subtle variations in colour as well as tangible physical texture.

Stones – monotype print

abstract print with standing stones

Stones is a monotype print reflecting my long-standing interest in Neolithic art. This print is about the Standing stones of which Avebury and Stonehenge are prime examples. Others however draw inspiration from cave paintings and rock carvings.  As ever this print is built up in layers with each layer a response to what was created by previous additions.  I am drawn to the way in which abstract, almost accidental layers of colour can be transformed into a harmonious image.

Often I begin with an arbitrary collection of shapes and colours simply from cleaning up the residue on a plate. In this case though everything has been built on the green and brown background layer.

The print is about 30 cm square. It is unmounted and unframed, although if you wish I can mount it on a cradled wooden panel, with black painted edges ready to hang on your wall.

During lockdown, I made a large series of  similar colourful abstract monotype prints. This intuitive approach to creating the image, of seeing the art as a record of a journey as much as being a thing in itself, is new for me, It represents a new direction for my work that I intend to continue to explore for a good while yet. Many draw their inspiration from real places, others while still abstract, have a link back to the world of experience, and yet others are pure abstract without external references beyond the broad ideas of harmony and balance.

What is a gel print?

Monotype prints in general are made by drawing or painting on a smooth, non-absorbent surface. This surface, sometimes called the matrix, was historically a copper etching plate. In contemporary work other materials are often used, such as acrylic sheet. The image on the matrix is then transferred onto a sheet of paper by pressing the two together. This usually requires a print press. Monotypes can also be created by inking an entire surface and then, using brushes or rags, removing ink to create light areas in a field of opaque colour. This is then pressed together with a sheet of paper to make the print.

The specific process I used for this print was gel printing (or Gelli but this is a trademark). The matrix in this case is a soft synthetic gel. I apply the paint to the gel sheet with rollers or brushes. The area to which the paint is applied can be controlled by masks and stencils. The rolled out paints can also be drawn into or textured in various ways. This process is repeated until I’m happy with the image.

Some of my prints made this way have over 20 separate full or partial layers. The nature of the process allows for both intense bright colours and  subtle variations in colour as well as tangible physical texture.

Sail to Windward – monotype print

Sailing to Windward

Sail to Windward is another example of my normal manner of working intuitively. I add each layer in response to what was created by previous additions. This means that prints are usually built up over several sessions. I am very drawn to the way in which abstract, almost accidental layers of colour can be transformed into a harmonious image. I think of it as responsive art, i.e. art that develops out of the environment in which it is being created. It is art as a journey to an unknown destination

Often I begin with an arbitrary collection of shapes and colours simply from cleaning up the residue on a plate. Sometimes these accumulate from deliberate choices. Usually though they are literally arbitrary – at least within the range of my normal palette. Often, knowing when to stop is the most difficult stage. It usually takes me a couple of weeks after the last layer is added before I’m sure a given print is complete.

The print is about 30 cm square. It is unmounted and unframed, although if you wish I can mount it on a cradled wooden panel, with black painted edges ready to hang on your wall.

During lockdown, I have made a series of  similar colourful abstract monotype prints. This intuitive approach to creating the image, of seeing the art as a record of a journey as much as being a thing in itself, is new for me, It represents a new direction for my work that I intend to continue to explore for a good while yet. Many draw their inspiration from real places, others while still abstract, have a link back to the world of experience, and yet others are pure abstract without external references beyond the broad ideas of harmony and balance. This one has references to landscape in that there is a sort of horizon line, but other elements are abstract.

What is a gel print?

Monotype prints in general are made by drawing or painting on a smooth, non-absorbent surface. This surface, sometimes called the matrix, was historically a copper etching plate. In contemporary work other materials are often used, such as acrylic sheet. The image on the matrix is then transferred onto a sheet of paper by pressing the two together. This usually requires a print press. Monotypes can also be created by inking an entire surface and then, using brushes or rags, removing ink to create light areas in a field of opaque colour. This is then pressed together with a sheet of paper to make the print.

The specific process I used for this print was gel printing (or Gelli but this is a trademark). The matrix in this case is a soft synthetic gel. I apply the paint to the gel sheet with rollers or brushes. The area to which the paint is applied can be controlled by masks and stencils. The rolled out paints can also be drawn into or textured in various ways. This process is repeated until I’m happy with the image.

Some of my prints made this way have over 20 separate full or partial layers. The nature of the process allows for both intense bright colours and  subtle variations in colour as well as tangible physical texture.